Lilias Day is a summer fayre has been part of the history of Kilbarchan since the latter part of the 17th century, and maybe...

Lilias Day is a summer fayre has been part of the history of Kilbarchan since the latter part of the 17th century, and maybe even earlier.

Tradition links the summer fayre held on Lilias Day to Lilias Cuninghame (1691 – 1720), the daughter of the 8th Baron Cuninghame of Craigends.

Many of the customs introduced 300 years ago are still part of today’s celebrations.

As far back as 1718 a parade through the village was the focal point of the fayre. ‘Tradesmen went through the town in grand procession with drums beating, colours flying, music playing
and garlands, swords etc’.

Floral arches were also erected throughout the village with streets competing for the best arch.

Weavers would down tools and spend days decorating the arches with heathers and flowers and still today the same friendly rivalry exists to see who can create the best float.

In 1876 another familiar feature was introduced to the Lilias Day celebration where villagers were invited to decorate their houses.

This tradition continues today with villagers transforming their houses and competing for the coveted title of best decorated house.

However the most important tradition to transcend the centuries is celebrating community and having a great day.

(Text taken from the Official Lilias Day Program 2015 – publication can be found here)