Gryffe High pupils attend Into Film Festival pupil premiere Gryffe High pupils attend Into Film Festival pupil premiere
Pupils from Gryffe High School attended the Into Film Festival launch this week. They join others pupils from across Scotland who will be attending... Gryffe High pupils attend Into Film Festival pupil premiere

Pupils from Gryffe High School attended the Into Film Festival launch this week. They join others pupils from across Scotland who will be attending over 240 free cinema screenings, special film events and accessing free resources through the Festival.

The seventh Into Film Festival (Wednesday 6th until 22nd November), hosted by film education charity Into Film, launched this week with pupil premieres across Scotland and the UK of new climate change documentary, 2040.

Cited as the first film aimed at young audiences to offer a hopeful response to eco-anxiety, 2040 is part of the Festival’s environmentally-themed screenings and events throughout the Festival and is supported by UNICEF.

The documentary explores what the future could look like by the year 2040 if we simply embraced the best solutions already available to us to improve our planet and shifted them rapidly into the mainstream.

This year’s festival comprises eight strands that can help educators navigate the packed programme: Mental Wellbeing & Identity, Language & Creativity, The Natural World, Exploring History, Debate, Fantasy & Adventure, Rebellion and Musicals.

Kirsty Gallacher, Into Film Programme Delivery Manager, Scotland, said: “Film is a powerful tool for learning and engagement. It’s rich in curriculum from story to screen and everything in between.

“The Into Film Festival programme in Scotland has so much to offer educators and their learners with so many screenings and special events that cover very relevant and current themes.

“There are still some tickets available and I would encourage teachers across Scotland to take a look at our programme to find out what’s on near them.”

The Into Film team has worked with cinemas, theatres and some unusual venues across Scotland, from castles to aquariums, to ensure pupils north of the border will have access to a wide variety of films.

Scottish youngsters will have their pick of historical dramas like Mary Queen of Scots, documentaries like Nae Pasaran, which chronicles how Scottish aircraft workers refused to fix engines in solidarity against Chile’s fascist dictatorship, and films like The Queen’s Corgi, a Belgian animation in which the queen’s most beloved dog must find his way back to the palace after being betrayed by his fellow corgi.

The Into Film programme supports children and young people to watch, make and understand film in new and creative ways, as well as learn about the film industry and foster a life-long love of cinema and filmmaking.


Photo: Pupils from Gryffe High in Houston attend a Into Film Festival screening

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